shared path road crossing

Small Steps

Close but no cigar, the “longest sealed pedestrian/bicycle path in Melbourne” (www.eastlink.com.au/downloadFile.aspx?file_id=297) is amongst its other failings interspersed with footpath segments, presented here with this particularly invasive example.

shared path road crossing

Despite having installed bicycle crossing lights at the intersection (see insert) a shared path end sign and the invasive pedestrian crossing both require cyclists to dismount and walk.

248 No riding across a road on a crossing

(1) The rider of a bicycle must not ride across a road, or part of a road, on a children’s crossing or pedestrian crossing.

Offence provision.

(2) The rider of a bicycle must not ride across a road, or part of a road, on a marked foot crossing, unless there are bicycle crossing lights at the crossing showing a green bicycle crossing light.

Offence provision.

While the foot crossing at the traffic lights is suitably equipped for bicycle thoroughfare the pedestrian crossing identified by the “zebra crossing” stripes across the slip lane prevents cyclists proceeding despite its self being an entirely redundant construct:

72 Giving way at an intersection (except a T-intersection or a roundabout)

[….]

(4) If the driver is turning left using a slip lane, the driver must give way to:

(a) any vehicle approaching from the right or turning right at the intersection into the road the driver is entering (except a vehicle making a U-turn at the intersection); and

(b) any pedestrian on the slip lane.

[….]

Though still without any references to bicycle riders, which would require marked cycle lanes and give way signs for the traffic to yield to them.

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2 thoughts on “Small Steps

    1. Yes, just as pedestrians must wait for their green crossing light, bicycle riders must wait before proceeding even if the road is clear, you press the button and wait for the traffic lights to sequence but that time delay can be minutes long at some intersections. As you can imagine the rule is ignored routinely by many pedestrians and cyclists.

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