All posts by meltdblog

West Gate Tunnel Project, past the distractions

Following the announcements of the elevated Veloway months ago the full scope of the West Gate Tunnel Project is now public with the state governments release of the Environment Effects Statement, but there is little time for the public to respond. The 10,000 page EES, works approval application and draft planning scheme amendment are on public exhibition from 29 May to 10 July 2017 at which point submissions are then closed. How does it look for cycling? Continue reading West Gate Tunnel Project, past the distractions

cyclists queuing on the road at an intersection

On the way to Upgrades

Swan St bridge is currently undergoing refurbishment with significant closures for cyclists and pedestrians, ahead of new expansive shared paths being installed across it as part of other works. The busy shared paths each side of the Yarra river which pass underneath are completely closed off during the works as they will be upgraded too, but whats in place while they’re out of action? Continue reading On the way to Upgrades

truck straddling middle of road

Nearside, the danger zone

Heavy vehicles have an awful safety record for their impact on other road users, through a combination of limited visibility and manoeuvrability along with their robust construction and weight even with their professional drivers taking the utmost care they still represent an inflated risk to other road users. But with the large majority of crashes involving heavy vehicles not the fault of its driver we have to look at how other drivers behave around them. Continue reading Nearside, the danger zone

truck wheel sitting on kerb

Lethal Weapons

Road deaths continue to accumulate in Victoria at their steady rate against a very slow growth in transport use, the easy improvements in road safety have been and gone and what options remain are politically “difficult”. While the media will make significant reports on any firearm deaths the much more common road fatalities receive much less attention. But how does the safety of these dangerous weapons compare? Continue reading Lethal Weapons